Tivoli in the Square: Hamilton’s free creative space is open to the community

By

Published May 16, 2022 at 2:29 pm

Tivoli in the Square: Hamilton's free creative space is open to the community
Tivoli in the Square is a free outdoor community-run space that provides a platform for local artists and entrepreneurs. Pitch your idea and get approval.

The property housing the legendary Tivoli Theatre has sat mostly vacant for nearly 20 years. Thanks to a grassroots initiative, the once-vibrant James St. North space will be brought back to life in 2022.

Tivoli in the Square is a free outdoor community-run space that provides a platform for local artists and entrepreneurs. To set up shop in the Square, all you have to do is pitch your idea and get the organizers’ approval.

Advertising
Advertising

Applications for the first round of scheduling must be submitted by May 26, 2022.

“Do you have an idea? Do you want to offer outdoor yoga? Do want to paint a mural? Do you want to set up a booth during art crawl? Connect with us today to pitch your idea,” reads the Tivoli in the Square official website.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by @tivoliinthesquare

Vendor applications for Food Truck Fridays, launched this spring, also remain open.

More information can be found online at tivolisquare.ca.

Tivoli in the Square: Hamilton's free creative space is open to the community

The initiative is being run by Alexandra Graham and Daniella Dolman with community partners and the support of property owners Aventus Developments and Society Developments.

The property was purchased after a 2014 condo development plan never materialized. The current owners say they have plans to revitalize the site.

The building that became the Tivoli Theatre started out in the 1870s as a carriage factory.

The factory went out of business in 1908 and an extension to the building was added at the back towards Hughson St.

In 1924, when it became known as the Tivoli, the theatre was substantially enlarged and increased seating for 1,800 to 2,000 patrons. It also became a venue for vaudeville shows and movie screenings.

insauga's Editorial Standards and Policies advertising