New evidence reinforces booster doses of COVID-19 vaccine: Hamilton’s McMaster University

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Published January 24, 2022 at 3:00 pm

Research out of Hamilton's McMaster University provides evidence reinforcing booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines for the most vulnerable.

Research out of Hamilton’s McMaster University provides evidence reinforcing booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines for the most vulnerable; including residents of long-term care homes, retirement homes, and assisted living facilities.

Researchers found that there was a robust immune response to a third mRNA vaccination and a greater capacity to fight infection compared to a two-dose series.

The findings are based on the blood tests of over 500 adult residents who received either Pfizer or Moderna as a third vaccine dose at least six months after their second shot.

New evidence reinforcing booster doses of COVID-19 vaccine: Hamilton's McMaster University

Andrew Costa is co-lead of the Canada’s Global Nexus task force on Long-Term Care Crisis Management and Renewal, and associate professor of health research methods, evidence, and impact at McMaster. Dawn Bowdish is an immunologist, Canada Research Chair in Aging and Immunity, and a professor in the department of medicine at McMaster.

This new data was published in the form of a research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.

Two of the researchers behind this work, Andrew Costa and Dawn Bowdish, will share the findings as part of a panel discussion on Jan. 24, hosted by the COVID-19 Immunity Task Force.

Their work is a continuation of earlier research, which found low antibody response in one in five long-term care residents three to five months after their second vaccine dose.

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