What Canadians and Americans stereotypes are believed, embraced and disliked?

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Published October 13, 2023 at 4:37 pm

stereotypes, hockey, maple syrup, study, eh
Canadians from Mississauga to Oakville to Brampton and Hamilton are growing tired of hearing stereotypes like we all love maple syrup and hockey PEXELS PHOTO

We hear them often and at times they make us cringe.

Be it in Oakville, Mississauga, Brampton, or Hamilton, us Canadians can’t often go long without being stereotyped in one way or another by our friends south of the border in the United Stages.

“You Canadians say ‘eh’ a lot,” we’re told as they laugh, and we respond with a have-hearted grin.

Or, how about “bet you love hockey”, or “bet you love maple syrup.”

Canadians have grown accustomed to those stereotypes, be it the ones we don’t mind or others we can’t stand and are tired of hearing about.

A study conducted by Preply, a language learning app and e-learning platform, asked both Canadians and Americans which stereotypes are believed, embraced, and hated and their overall views regarding their neighbour country.

As well as stereotypes, residents of both countries were also asked to assign specific descriptions to one of the two countries they feel better represented each. Descriptions included: more LGBTQIA+ friendly, more religious, healthier, stricter laws, and more.

Among the stereotypes Canadians have grown tired of hearing about, the top five reasons found by the study are:

  1. Say “eh” a lot (42 per cent)
  2. Love hockey (40 per cent)
  3. Love Tim Hortons (37 per cent)
  4. Speak French (37 per cent)
  5. Love maple syrup (24 per cent)
  6. Can ice skate (24 per cent)
  7. Say “sorry” a lot (24 per cent)

The study did find, though, that nine in 10 Canadians think stereotypes about their country are mostly positive. One in two Canadians say they believe stereotypes about residents of other countries.

While looked upon as being harmless jokes, six in 10 Canadians think stereotypes are harmful and seven in 10 say they can be viewed as racism.

While at times these stereotypes continue due to a lack of communication or understanding about one’s culture, they enhance the generalizations made between the two countries.

Communication is key breaking down stereotypes and here are some key takeaways found by the study:

  • Of respondents, one in four Americans think the U.S. is more welcoming to immigrants than Canada.
  • When it comes to happiness, 86 per cent of Americans think Canadians are happier than them.
  • According to 7 in 10 Canadians, stereotypes can be viewed as racism.
  • When it comes to laws, 40 per cent of Canadians think U.S. laws are stricter.
  • That all Canadians say “eh” and love hockey are the two stereotypes’ Canadians are most tired of hearing.

Here are some other key findings of the study:

  • Top 3 stereotypes Canadians are most tired of hearing: They say “eh,” love hockey, and love Tim Hortons.
  • Perceptions that Canadians are environmentally conscious, neighborly, and happy are the top stereotypes believed by both Americans and Canadians.
  • 9 in 10 Canadians think stereotypes about their country are mostly positive.
  • 97 per cent of Canadians think Canada is more welcoming to immigrants than the U.S.
  • 7 in 10 Canadians embrace the “all Canadians say ‘sorry’ a lot” stereotype.
  • Nearly 3 in 5 Canadians think they are funnier than Americans.
  • 7 in 10 Canadians think stereotypes can be viewed as racism.

 

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