Oakville’s Hayden, Bailey among 85 appointees to Order of Canada

By

Published June 29, 2022 at 10:35 am

Oakvllle's Frank Joseph Hayden was named one of the 85 appointees to the Order of Canada on Wednesday by Gov. Gen. Mary Simon. WESTERN UNIVERSITY PHOTO

Right from his days at Western University back in the early 1950’s, Oakville’s Frank Joseph Hayden held a special place in his heart for the disabled.

He would go on to research fitness programs and help the Joseph P. Kennedy Foundation produce and build a fitness program for persons with disabilities, before helping the foundation organize the first Chicago Special Olympics.


Hayden’s work was recognized Wednesday when he was named one of the 85 appointees to the Order of Canada by Gov. Gen. Mary Simon.

Hayden joins fellow Oakville recipient and track star Donovan Bailey for the prestigious award which recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation.

Hayden’s promotion within the Order was to Companion, the highest level a recipient can receive for Canada’s highest civilian honour.

He was recognized for promoting and advocating the transformative effect of sport on the mental, physical and social well-being of people with intellectual disabilities.

Bailey was honoured for his excellence in track and field, and for his philanthropic commitment to youth, amateur athletes and his community.

“For me, I just want to be a great example for young Canadians that they themselves can follow into my footsteps,” Bailey said when reached ahead of the announcement in Vancouver.

He recorded a time of 9.84 seconds to win the gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games.

“Hopefully, I was one of those positive people who (inspire others to) believe that Canada should be positive and Canada should be confident and Canada can take on anybody and come out golden.”

Recipients will be presented with their insignia at a later date in Ottawa, depending on their availability. Rideau Hall hosts an average of four investiture ceremonies a year.

Honorees get a silver insignia shaped like a six-pointed snowflake with a red annulus in the middle and a royal crown above.

It also features a stylized Maple Leaf with the order’s motto: Desiderantes Meliorem Patriam, which means, “They desire a better country.”

Created in 1967, the Order of Canada recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. More than 7,600 people from all sectors of society have been invested.

  • With files from Canadian Press
insauga's Editorial Standards and Policies

Stay the know

Subscribe now to receive our daily email of today's top stories in your city!

Related News

advertising