Mississauga Residents Concerned About Biased Information On Peel Region Separation

 

Many know that Mayor Bonnie Crombie wants Mississauga to leave the Peel Region. However, many Brampton and Mississauga residents have spoken on the issue and believe that the two cities shouldn't split.

Council has previously passed Crombie's motion requesting the province pass legislation that Mississauga become independent from Peel.

Crombie believes that as Mississauga grows into a much larger city than Brampton and Caledon, they should prioritize their own interest as a single-tier municipality. The mayor points to single-tier cities like Ottawa, Hamilton, Windsor and London and says that they are better off making their own decisions.

Recently, the Mississauga Residents’ Association Network shared their concern.

They are concerned that there is a lot of biased information about the effects a separation from Peel Region can have on Mississauga.

They state that the province should not rush into this process.

The Mississauga Residents’ Association Network is an association of Residents’ Association across the city. They recently attended the Peel Consultation of the Regional Government Review to express their concerns.

The association compares the separation to divorce and says, “a divorce almost always creates unhappiness and unintended consequences - constant legal wrangling and costs, neglected offspring, and broken individuals. The same could happen at the regional level if the City of Mississauga leaves.”

They state that amalgamation does not work and does not yield any benefits. The separation between Mississauga and the Peel Region also raises questions about accountability, chaos, and, legal bills.

They are requesting a report conducted by an unbiased third party. They say that the Region of Peel’s Deloitte Report and the City of Mississauga’s Corporate Report contradict each other and believe it is essential to have an unbiased report.

The association points out that in the City of Mississauga’s own Citizens’ Satisfaction Surveys, about 90 per cent of residents rated the overall quality of life as excellent or good, and about 70 per cent were satisfied with the City’s municipal government. They aim to prove that these statistics prove that Mississauga’s council is not broken, but needs small adjustments.

Mississauga Residents’ Association Network says, that they are “concerned about the one-sided focus on taxes and costs while ignoring investments in our future, and believes the consultation process lacks transparency and therefore legitimacy.”

According to the association, the residents of Peel should ultimately be the ones to decide the fate of their region, not the councillors or the province.

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