Interest rate hike expected to further impact home sales in Mississauga and Brampton

Published July 13, 2022 at 10:57 am

With the Bank of Canada raising its key interest rate by a full percentage point today (July 13), some experts believe it will keep more potential home buyers in Mississauga and Brampton on the sidelines.

The move will mean mortgages will become more expensive as well as impact household finances, pressures that could keep potential buyers away from homes in a market that has already seen a decline in sales nation-wide in the past year.


The hike is the largest single rate increase since 1998 and signals a more aggressive approach to bringing skyrocketing inflation back down to its target of two per cent.

Inflation reached a 39-year-high of 7.7 per cent in May.

In its latest monetary policy report, the Bank of Canada said inflation in Canada is “largely the result of international factors,” but that “domestic demand pressures are becoming more prominent.”

Most economists had forecasted a rate hike of three-quarters of a percentage point.

After raising interest rates by half a percentage point in June, Governor Tiff Macklem said the central bank “may need to move more quickly” to bring inflation down.

Wednesday’s rate hike brings the overnight interest rate up to 2.5 per cent.

The central bank said the largest drivers of global inflation are the Russian invasion of Ukraine and ongoing supply disruptions, leading to higher global energy and food prices.

Inflation in the U.S. soared to a new four-decade peak in June. Consumer prices rose 9.1 per cent compared with a year earlier, the government said on Wednesday.

Statistics Canada is expected to release Canada’s inflation data for June on July 20.

Domestically, the Bank of Canada said “further excess demand has built up,” citing tight labour markets and strong demand.

That excess demand is allowing businesses to pass more of their cost increases on to consumers, the bank said.

The unemployment rate fell to a record-low of 4.9 per cent in June as businesses continue to struggle with an ongoing labour shortage.

The central bank is also citing concerns about rising inflation expectations among consumers and businesses. Economists generally worry when people begin expecting high inflation, as those expectations then feed into future prices set by business and wage negotiations.

“The bank is guarding against the risk that high inflation becomes entrenched because if it does, restoring price stability will require even higher interest rates, leading to a weaker economy,” said the central bank.

In its forecast, the Bank of Canada expects GDP growth to begin to slow this year, growing by 1.75 per cent in 2023 and 2.5 per cent in 2024.

– with files from The Canadian Press

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