Hamilton reports 11 new COVID-19 infections as it awaits Omicron test results on two cases

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Published November 30, 2021 at 2:31 pm

Hamilton is reporting 11 newly confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday (Nov. 30) as the province of Ontario surpasses a grim milestone in its battle against the pandemic.

As of Tuesday, 10,000 people across Ontario have died as a result of COVID-19 since the virus was first detected here in early 2020.

In Hamilton, the virus-related death toll is up to 419 and has remained relatively stable in recent months.

As it stands, there are currently 159 active cases of COVID-19 in the community and nine active outbreaks.

A total of 16 people are being treated for virus-related illness in Hamilton hospitals presently of which fewer than 10 are in local ICUs.

On Monday, Ontario’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Kieran Moore disclosed that two recently discovered COVID-19 cases may stem from the Omicron variant that originated in Southern Africa.

Confirmation on the origin of those cases via genome sequencing is still pending but the new cases were found in two Hamilton residents who recently returned from travelling to South Africa.

Quebec confirmed its first Omicron case and Ottawa Public Health confirmed two more late Monday. Those were in addition to the country’s first two infections that were recorded in Ottawa over the weekend.

Ontario reported 687 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, with 329 of those in people who are not fully vaccinated.

Health Minister Christine Elliott said 266 people are currently hospitalized across the province with the virus of which 218 are not fully vaccinated.

To date in Ontario, 22,978,037 vaccine doses have been administered with early 89.9 per cent of Ontarians 12+ with one dose and nearly 86.4 per cent with two doses.

So far, 895,729 doses have been administered in Hamilton with 83.3 per cent of eligible residents fully vaccinated and 86.3 with one dose.

— with a file from The Canadian Press

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