‘Guns have no place in Hamilton:’ Mayor Eisenberger responds to Canada gun control legislation

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Published May 31, 2022 at 5:26 pm

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger is among the many supporters of the new firearms-control legislation introduced by the federal government this week.

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger is among the many supporters of the new firearms-control legislation introduced by the federal government this week.

With very limited exceptions, the bill would put a national freeze on importing, buying, selling, or otherwise transferring handguns.

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“I have long advocated for such measures and I wish to publicly thank Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino for taking strong action in this way to stem gun violence,” issued Eisenberger in a statement. “Hamilton, Canada’s 10th largest city, has experienced an increasing number of disturbing incidents of gun violence which are unacceptable to our community and I stand with those advocating for tougher measures. Bill C-21 is a significant and positive step forward.”

“Too many violent incidents involve handguns which make their way across the border with the U.S. to Canada and I strongly support the enhanced border security measures proposed by the government,” he added.

The Liberal government bill proposes the automatic removal of gun licences from people who commit domestic violence or engage in criminal harassment, such as stalking.

It includes a measure to guard the safety of those applying through the process — often women in danger of domestic abuse — by protecting their identities.

The legislation would also create a “red flag” law allowing courts to require that people considered a danger to themselves or others surrender their firearms to police.

'Guns have no place in Hamilton:' Mayor Eisenberger responds to Canada gun control legislation

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau introduced new firearms-control legislation this week.

“Poverty reduction, creating equitable opportunities and positive community engagement are also keys to preventing gun violence,” continued Eisenberger. “However, strong measures that reduce the prevalence, sale and trade of handguns through both illegal and legal means are urgently needed.”

“I firmly believe that handguns have no place in Hamilton and my hope is that Bill-C21 becomes law and is implemented as soon as possible.”

Firearm-related homicides have gone up 37 per cent over the past 11 years in Canada, and handguns were the most commonly used weapon in such crimes.

 

-with files from The Canadian Press

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