Did You Know About These Mississauga Beaches?

Even though this summer hasn't been incredibly hot, it's brought us a few choice sunny days—days that you might not realize you could have enjoyed on a Mississauga or Peel beach.

Yes, that's right—we have beaches.

They might not be incredibly vast or expansive, but they're scenic and pretty and offer opportunities to swim, tan and take sexy bathing suit selfies (hold your phone high above your head to look extra fit!).

Here's a look at five local beaches you might not have thought to check out yet this summer:


Mississauga


Jack Darling Park

Jack Darling Park (1180 Lakeshore Road West) is an ideal summer park that sits on Lake Ontario and boasts an abundance of nature, a quaint beach and a two picnic areas, both of which can seat up to 75 people. If you don’t want to endure a cold lunch while sunbathing, you can use one of the site’s many barbecues (is there anything better than a hotdog on a big outdoor day?). The park also offers public washrooms, so you don’t have to refrain from enjoying a beverage with your burger or charcuterie—or from drinking water when you get a little too hot. The park boasts a spacious beach front area with bicycle paths, a windsurfing launch pad, tennis courts, a splash pad, and a footpath that leads to the Rattray Marsh.


Richard’s Memorial Park

If you're looking for another beach along Mississauga's Lakeshore Blvd. area, you might want to visit Richard's Memorial Park. Located south of Lakeshore Road and east of Lorne Park Estates in Mississauga, the park sits on Lake Ontario and offers 170m of beach. Beyond the beach, the park also offers trails and picnic areas, so you can enjoy a scenic walk and a satisfying midday lunch. There are no lifeguards on the beach, so take necessary precautions. The park also contains a waterfront trail, a rock garden, a children’s playground.


Lakefront Promenade Park

Lakefront Promenade is located off Lakeshore Road East, east of Cawthra Road in Mississauga and it offers a nice beachfront for anyone looking to swim in a natural body of water close to him. According to the Region of Peel, the swimming area is inland but fed by Lake Ontario. If you aren't that into swimming or want to do a few more things during your visit, note that there's a playground and splash pad, a marina, wetlands, a boardwalk and patio and grill. Interestingly enough, the swimming area is sheltered from Lake Ontario and is relatively spacious—so you'll have lots of room to splash around.


Brampton


Professor's Lake

Want to hit a beach in Brampton? If you do, head over to Professor's Lake. Located north of North Park Drive, the hotspot consists of a manmade lake that was once a gravel quarry. The region says it has a large area with deep and shallow points for swimming. The facility also has a water slide and lifeguards, so you have a little extra security if you're not a strong swimmer. According to the region, Professor's Lake was originally a sand and gravel pit that, over the years, provided the Toronto area with 20 million tonnes of gravel. The complex is 65 acres and the spring-fed lake is used for non-motorized boating, swimming and even triathlons. The area boasts a water slide, volleyball and tennis spots, a walking path and ice skating in the winter. In the summer, Professor's Lake opens the boathouse, picnic areas and food concession stands.


Caledon


Caledon Teen Ranch

Teen ranches aren't just in movies. According to the region, Caledon Teen Ranch is a private sports and recreational camp. It boasts a spring-fed pond located within the Teen Ranch property and is used as the swimming area for camp patrons. Teen Ranch, though scenic, isn't accessible to all members of the public, as it's a private Christian camp. That said, kids who attend the facility can swim, ride horses and play hockey (which sounds pretty idyllic, we must say). The region says Peel Health tests the swimming area but the pond is not open to the public.

Your Comments