Changes could be coming to noise control policies in Mississauga

 

If you've made a noise complaint in Mississauga (or been the subject of one), you might feel like the Nuisance Type Noise By-law and the Noise Control By-law are in need of some updating—especially as Mississauga becomes less and less of a bedroom community.  

The City of Mississauga recently announced that it's updating its noise bylaws to make them "more responsive to community needs." 

"As the City evolves from a suburban community to an urban centre, there is an opportunity to modernize how noise is regulated," the city said in a news release. 

City staff are currently reviewing both of the aforementioned bylaws and will consult with residents and stakeholders on a range of proposed options.  

The potential changes will cover aspects such as the complaint response process, residential and construction noise exemptions, permitted periods for amplified sound and noise thresholds.

As of now, the nuisance-type noise bylaw says that noise such as the sound or noise from or created by any radio, phonograph, television, public address system, sound equipment, loudspeaker or any musical or sound-producing instrument of whatever kind can be disturbing if it is operated in such volume as to annoy or disturb the peace. 

The bylaw also calls out the "grating, grinding or rattling, screaming, screeching or similar noise or sound caused by the operation of a motor of any kind" as potentially disruptive and in violation of the bylaw. 

It also mentions "crying, shouting or loud speaking in or adjacent to any public street or place, or near private swimming pools."  

The bylaw says that anyone who contravenes any provision of the bylaw is guilty of an offence and is liable to a fine of not more than $5,000. 

The noise control bylaw, which is a bit broader, sets out what noises are acceptable during special occasions (such as religious or cultural celebrations). It also sets out what times more excessive noise can be permitted and what noise emanating from motor vehicles is acceptable. 

With the city changing, residents are encouraged to have their say on changes to noise bylaws by attending an upcoming public meeting, or providing feedback online by taking a survey, asking a question or sharing their ideas.


Public Meeting Dates: 

Monday, January 20

6 to 8 p.m.

Huron Park Community Centre

830 Paisley Blvd. W.


Tuesday, January 21

6 to 8 p.m.

Malton Victory Hall

3091 Victory Crescent


Wednesday, January 29

6 to 8 p.m.

South Common Community Centre

2233 South Millway


Thursday, January 30

6 to 8 p.m.

Tomken Twin Arena Auditorium

4495 Tomken Rd.

What changes do you think should be made to the noise bylaws in Mississauga? 

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